Ke Aloha Nui Uncle John Lind

Uncle John Lind of Kīpahulu ʻOhana passed on earlier today. The family loses a husband, brother, father, uncle and grandfather. Kīpahulu and East Maui lost an elder lawaiʻa and mahiʻai, an icon among taro farmers and quiet leader who with his ohana perpetuated a way of life amidst great change in Kīpahulu. Uncle John was respected in the tradition of konohiki for his community. He pointed the way forward.

KOLE AKU KOLE MAI !

What does Kole aku kole mai mean? In ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi, Kole is commonly known as a tasty and desirable reef fish. However, when reduplicated, kolekole is an informal talk story. With its directionals, Kole aku kole mai becomes a reciprocation of stories we share amongst each other! 

We have seasons. Our work is sacred. We persist.

A MESSAGE FROM OUR CO-DIRECTOR | Aloha friends, ‘ohana and supporters… I’ve been reflecting on the enduring cycles and rhythms that, despite our separateness, we continue to share in together. That we are pulled by the same moon, warmed by the same sun, receive the same changing of seasons, overseen by the same fundamental energetics–Lono, Kanaloa, Kū, Kāne… They persist. As do we.

E Alu Pū Gathering 2019: Intergenerational knowledge sharing and solidarity

In May of 2019, over 100 kiaʻi loko (fishpond caretakers) and supporters gathered at the Waialua Church Pavilion on Molokaʻi for the 2019 Annual Gathering. Hosted by Uncle Leimana Naki of Kahina Pohaku in Moanui, they shared knowledge, discussed, restored, built, and continued to set intentions for their mission: to empower a network of kiaʻi loko whose kuleana is to reactivate, restore, and cultivate loko iʻa guided by loko iʻa culture in pursuit of ʻāina momona for ʻohana and communities.