Huli The Movement: A KUA supported project in Maunalua

Aloha. My name is Jesse Yonover and I co-founded Huli with Austin Kino. Austin and I grew up surfing, diving, fishing, paddling, and sailing in Maunalua Bay. We started Huli as a way to give back to the youth in our community. We felt that the bay was such a special part of the natural environment of the region and it was important to get the local students more involved with the stewardship of this resource, especially in an educational setting.

From Lāhui to Rāhui: Community stewardship across Polynesia

In April of this year KUA was invited to participate in a week long workshop in Papeete Tahiti, supported by the European Union and facilitated by the Secretariat of the Pacific and the Tahitian Ministry of Fisheries.  The workshop was entitled: “Sharing our lessons from participatory management of reef fisheries in Polynesia – Partager nos expériences de […]

All ʻĀina World Dance Party

For our 2016 year-end fundraiser, KUA hosted an ALL-ʻĀina WORLD Dance Party in support of this grassroots MOVEMENT.
Our goal was to raise $10,000 and get 100 people dancing in celebration of ʻaina momona — abundant lands and waters!
Thanks to all of YOU, we doubled down on our previous fundraising effort in 2014 and WOW LAULAU, we actually reached it!!!

Uncle Jerry Kaluhiwa, Na Koa Limu

Long before the Limu Hui was formed and long before many of us were even aware of the need to protect our limu beds, Jerry Leroy Mahilani Kaluhiwa predicted the decline of limu in Kaneʻohe Bay, Oahu. Unlike most people who just sit and complain about the need for somebody to do something, Uncle Jerry stepped up to do something about it.

An Instrument of Aloha: Remembering Ernie Cruz Jr.

By Kevin Chang ~ Ernie Cruz Jr. is a friend of mine known mostly for his memorable voice and the era of Hawaiian music he helped start and contributed to along the way. As a musician and friend I am also a fan of his. I am lucky to know him. But Ernie was more than his music. He was just only getting started. I want people to know this. Ernie was just coming into his own.

Special Gathering of Indigenous Peoples and Local Community Organizations in Antigua, Guatemala

There is a Hawaiian proverb that says: “(t)he land is the chief; man is its servant.” [1] It is often cited among Native Hawaiian and grassroots community stewardship networks my organization is privileged to serve. Feeling it might resonate with new friends, I used it in my talk at an inaugural gathering of Indigenous peoples and local community International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Members in Antigua, Guatemala. The thoughtful reflections in the room affirmed for me that my home – an isolated community over 2,000 miles of ocean away from others – is connected to a larger global family. We can build bridges.

Uncle Allen Kaiaokamalie

Uncle Allen Kaiaokamalie spent alot of time at Keomoku, Maunalei Ahupua’a where he had his “limu farm” as he called it. It turned out to be an appropriate name for that place because he became very successful at growing ogo in open ocean cages. Early attempts to grow limu in this manner ended with frustration. […]