Equator Prize winners from Hāʻena & Moʻomomi at UN awards ceremony in NYC

(Kahaluʻu, Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi) ~ As Moʻomomi awaits Governor Ige’s release of its Community-Based Subsistence Fishing Areas (CBSFA) proposal for public hearings and input, an initiative years in the making, representatives of that effort are in New York City to accept global recognition for their work.  The two Hawaiian community groups who shared the $10,000 Equator prize awarded earlier this year by the UN Development Programme and its partners will be well-represented at the awards ceremony on September 24.

The rise of fishpond restoration a sign of hope in difficult times

In May of 2019, over 100 kiaʻi loko (fishpond caretakers) and supporters gathered at the Waialua Church Pavilion on Molokaʻi for the 2019 Annual Gathering. Hosted by Uncle Leimana Naki of Kahina Pohaku in Moanui, they shared knowledge, discussed, restored, built, and continued to set intentions for their mission: to empower a network of kiaʻi loko whose kuleana is to reactivate, restore, and cultivate loko iʻa guided by loko iʻa culture in pursuit of ʻāina momona for ʻohana and communities.

Two Grassroots Hawaiʻi Hui Share Global Equator Prize

(Kahaluʻu, Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi) ~ As Moʻomomi awaits Governor Ige’s release of its Community-Based Subsistence Fishing Areas (CBSFA) proposal for public hearings and input, an initiative years in the making, representatives of that effort are in New York City to accept global recognition for their work.  The two Hawaiian community groups who shared the $10,000 Equator prize awarded earlier this year by the UN Development Programme and its partners will be well-represented at the awards ceremony on September 24.

Loko Iʻa Gathering 2019: Building a fishpond, a hale, and a community

In May of 2019, over 100 kiaʻi loko (fishpond caretakers) and supporters gathered at the Waialua Church Pavilion on Molokaʻi for the 2019 Annual Gathering. Hosted by Uncle Leimana Naki of Kahina Pohaku in Moanui, they shared knowledge, discussed, restored, built, and continued to set intentions for their mission: to empower a network of kiaʻi loko whose kuleana is to reactivate, restore, and cultivate loko iʻa guided by loko iʻa culture in pursuit of ʻāina momona for ʻohana and communities.

Kaʻa I Ka Lawa, to be enough.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Media Contact: Kim Moa Communications Coordinator, Kuaʻāina Ulu ʻAuamo 808-672-2545 kim@kuahawaii.org Local funders support capacity-building and long-term sustainability in ʻāina-based community efforts. HONOLULU, HI (September 24, 2018) ~ “Natural and cultural resources have invisible human webs all around them,” says Chris Cramer, Founder and President of the Maunalua Fishpond Heritage Center, a […]

E Alu Pū Gathering 2017: Right to Mālama

(Koʻolau-Kona, Kauaʻi) ~ E Alu Pū s a movement of community projects, families, groups, and organizations involved in stewardship of bio-cultural resources mai uka a i kai (from upland to the ocean). Each summer these kua‘āina (grassroots) communities come together for an annual gathering. They support, teach and mentor each other, share lessons learned, work side-by-side, and nurture a productive space for growth and strengthened relationships. In July 2017, members of E Alu Pū gathered on Kauaʻi for the 14th Annual E Alu Pū Gathering.

Reflections from Limu Hui Gathering 2017

(Pa‘ia, Wailuku, Maui) ~ In June 2017, loea limu (limu gatherers), haumana (students), researchers and passionate individuals who actively work to restore knowledge, practice, and abundance of native Hawaiian limu across Hawai‘i came together in Pa‘ia, Maui for the 4th Annual Limu Hui Gathering.  

Participants in this year’s gathering, Kanoelani Steward & Kim Kanoeʻulalani Morishige reflect on lessons learned, stories shared and their time spent with kūpuna (elders) during the four-day event.

Hui Mālama Loko Iʻa Gathering 2017: Kaiāulu Hanakahi

(Kulapae, Waiākea, Hilo, Hawaiʻi) ~ In April 2017, over 100 kiaʻi loko and supporters gathered in Keaukaha and Waiākea, Hawaiʻi for the 2017 Annual Gathering. They participated in various workshops and restoration projects hosted by Honokea Loko, with support from Hale o Lono, and Waiāhole fishponds. They also took part in a reactivation ceremony at Lālākea fishpond in Waipiʻo Valley on the Hāmākua Coast.

Huli The Movement: A KUA supported project in Maunalua

Aloha. My name is Jesse Yonover and I co-founded Huli with Austin Kino. Austin and I grew up surfing, diving, fishing, paddling, and sailing in Maunalua Bay. We started Huli as a way to give back to the youth in our community. We felt that the bay was such a special part of the natural environment of the region and it was important to get the local students more involved with the stewardship of this resource, especially in an educational setting.